Female Policing Persons
IN THIS SECTION Background Heroic Acts BACKGROUND, INPUT 10 Influential Female Police Officers Who Paved the Way By Will Erstad on 03/23/2015 https://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/justice-studies/blog/influential-female-police-officers/ Excerpt: There was a time in our history when the very idea of a female police officer was unheard of. We’ve come a long way since then. Today, there are more than 100,000 sworn female police officers in the United States alone! This progress didn’t just happen overnight, though. It took years of smaller breakthroughs brought on by these determined female officers in the face of a world that thought of them as nothing more than caretakers and housewives. This list highlights and celebrates some of the most influential female police officers and explains how they impacted the field of law enforcement. https://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/justice-studies/blog/influential-female-police-officers/ Women in Policing The Numbers Fall Far Short of the Need Ivonne Roman, Chief of Police (Ret.), Newark Police Department, New Jersey https://www.policechiefmagazine.org/women-in-policing/ Excerpt: Police Chief Magazine|Topics|Recruitment & Personnel|Women in Policing Share Women in Policing The Numbers Fall Far Short of the Need Ivonne Roman, Chief of Police (Ret.), Newark Police Department, New Jersey The presence of women in policing in the United States lags well behind that of comparable countries. Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom all have nearly twice the U.S. percentage of policewomen.1 That persistent hiring deficit defies research spanning more than 50 years that well documents the benefits of women in policing. Women are consistently rated as trusted by their communities and, importantly, are motivated to serve communities in an era of decreased police legitimacy.2 Women have high levels of interpersonal communication skills, which translates into more effective practices in the field.3 Women are found to have a calming effect on male partners in high-stress and dangerous assignments, resulting in fewer police deaths.4 Higher levels of female representation are associated with organizations that emphasize community policing.5 Female police officers have a positive influence on the perceived job performance, trustworthiness, and fairness of a police agency, perhaps increasing the public’s willingness to cooperate in the production of positive public safety outcomes.6 Female officers are less likely to use force, use excessive force, or be named in a lawsuit than male officers.7 https://www.policechiefmagazine.org/women-in-policing/ Director's Corner: March 2019 | Volume 12 | Issue 2Women in Policing https://cops.usdoj.gov/html/dispatch/03-2019/Directors_Message.html Excerpt: As National Women’s History Month, March is an excellent time to acknowledge the many achievements of our female law enforcement officers and leaders, who now account for nearly 13 percent of those who serve throughout our nation and include about 300 women who are chiefs of police. Since Portland, Oregon, swore in the first female officer in 1908, these dedicated women have joined their male counterparts in making public safety their number one priority. Notable examples are Officers Moira Smith and Kathy Mazza of the New York Police Department—who lost their lives while rescuing victims from the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center—and, more recently, Officer Nicole Battaglia of the Alexandria (Virginia) Police Department—who, under fire, helped her fellow officers shoot the gunman who wounded five congressman during a baseball practice in 2017. These heroes are just a few among hundreds of women who put themselves in harm’s way to protect the public, strive to reduce violent crime, and build strong relationships with the communities they serve. However, women in the workforce are still underrepresented. Recognizing their contributions, departments across the country are making efforts to recruit more women. According to Kym Craven, the executive director of the National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE), raising their numbers is especially important today, as the challenges facing law enforcement have changed. “The policing model has evolved,” she says, “requiring more personal interaction. It’s become more of a caretaking role, which women tend to be better at. . . . A few decades ago, policing was focused on the cocaine wars, and after 9/11, [on the] response to terrorism. Today, the more common challenges are opioid abuse, mental health issues, violent crimes, and homelessness. For example, instead of just arresting drug addicts, officers now carry life-saving naloxone to counter an opioid overdose.” https://cops.usdoj.gov/html/dispatch/03-2019/Directors_Message.html HEROIC ACTS CALIFORNIA https://majesticdeco.com/heroic-female-officer-saves-elderly-man-in-wheelchair-from-oncoming-train/ FLORIDA https://www.police1.com/police-heroes/articles/fla-officer-takes-10-rounds-to-save-children-her-own-life- XNbtjzK0cqS4K3a8/ TEXAS Fort Hood https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/fort-hood-shooting/fort-hood-four-dead-16-hurt-female-cop-who-ended-n70556 A "heroic" female cop ended Wednesday’s Fort Hood shooting rampage by confronting an Iraq war vet who had killed three colleagues and wounded 16 others. The military police officer was only 20 feet from the gunman – who was named by officials as Ivan A. Lopez, a 34-year-old who was being treated for depression and anxiety. Lopez, who had also "self-reported" a traumatic head injury during service, later took his own life. Three of the wounded were still fighting for their lives in the intensive care unit of a nearby civilian hospital, doctors said early Thursday. The shooting spree came 4½ years after 13 people died in a rampage on the same Texas base. Lopez was carrying his semi-automatic weapon in a parking lot when confronted by the female officer, Fort Hood’s commanding officer told reporters. "He was approaching her at about 20 feet. He put his hands up, then reached under his jacket, pulled out the (.45) and she pulled out her weapon and then she engaged, and he then he put the weapon to his head," Lt. Gen. Mark Milley said late Wednesday. The female police officer's actions appeared to prompt the end of the killing spree. “What she did was heroic,” Milley added. "She did her job and she did exactly what we’d expect from U.S. Army military police.” https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/fort-hood-shooting/fort-hood-four-dead-16-hurt-female-cop-who-ended-n70556 Updates: 2021/08/14 PAGE STARTED-Female Policing Persons;
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