WHISTLEBLOWER SECTION Whistle-1 Whistle-2a-Snowden Whistle-2b Snowden Links Whistle-3a Kiriakou FBI Whistle-3b Kiriakou Articles Whistle-3c Kiriakou Links Whistle-3d Kiriakou Comments --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BACKGROUND - JOHN KIRIAKOU CIA Counterterrorism officer o CIA Officer 1990 -2004 (not sure if he was on duty in the CIA that whole time; perhaps he worked in other departments here and there) Senate Foreign Relations Committee Bestselling Author Prison - released after serving 23 months of a 30 month sentence for exposing the CIA’s illegal torture program The Real News http //therealnews com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=13680 Excerpt: John Kiriakou is a former CIA counterterrorism officer, a former senior investigator for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and a bestselling author. He was recently released from prison after serving 23 months of a 30 month sentence for exposing the CIA's illegal torture program. http //therealnews com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=13680 ISSUES Charges - Real or Alleged Crime Revealed two CIA personnel names to journalists - one a covert agent and one an employee engaged in classified activities Charges Four count complaint issued in Eastern Virginia Intelligence Identities Protection Act - one count - for allegedly illegally disclosing the identity of a covert officer Espionage Act - two counts - for allegedly illegally disclosing national defense information to individuals not authorized to receive it. Lying to CIA Publications Review Board - one count - in an unsuccessful attempt to trick the CIA into allowing him to include classified information in a book he was seeking to publish Key concept: surveillance photos of govt personnel (presumably in the act of connection with detainees) The investigation revealed that on multiple occasions, one of the journalists to whom Kiriakou is alleged to have illegally disclosed classified information, in turn, disclosed that information to a defense team investigator, and that this information was reflected in the classified defense filing and enabled the defense team to take or obtain surveillance photographs of government personnel. There are no allegations of criminal activity by any members of the defense team for the detainees. Notice the language by the FBI that Kiriakou was trying to “trick” the government by lying. The tone and language are revelatory and offer insights into an MO (modus operandi) running thru-out the govt org. Location Alexandria Virginia is the location of charges and was reviewed by Judge John F. Anderson Acts Involved, etc The Intelligence Identities Protection Act Espionage Act Judges and Others Involved Anderson: U.S. Magistrate Judge John F. Anderson in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia Defense Team for detainees Martinez: Officer B: Deuce Martinez Kiriakou’s alleged disclosures occurred prior to a June 2008 front-page story in The New York Times disclosing Officer B’s alleged role in the Abu Zubaydah operation: Deuce Martinez Holder: Attorney General Holder Presence Around Kiriakou Issue Holder said, “Safeguarding classified information, including the identities of CIA officers involved in sensitive operations, is critical to keeping our intelligence officers safe and protecting our national security,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “Today’s charges reinforce the Justice Department’s commitment to hold accountable anyone who would violate the solemn duty not to disclose such sensitive information.” Names from FBI Article-01/23/2012 (Please note the regional aspect in that various states were involved): Anderson, John F. (U.S. Magistrate Judge in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia) Fayhee, Ryan (DOJ trial attorney Counterespionage Section of the National Security Division) Fitzgerald Patrick J. (Special Attorney Northern District of Illinois) Holder, Eric (Attorney General) Lan, Iris (Assistant U.S. Attorney/Southern District of New York) McJunkin, James W. FBI (Separate Page-FBI section) Owings, Lisa (Assistant U.S. Attorney(Eastern District of Virginia) Schneider, Mark E. (Northern District of Illinois) Other names -related to case: Rizzo, John then CIA general Counsel - demanded investigation (see Mother Jones 01/23/2012) http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2012/01/john-kiriakou-cia-leak-investigation/ From Democracy Now: https://www.democracynow.org/2013/1/30/whistleblower_john_kiriakou_for_embracing_torture Judge Leonie Brinkema Jesselyn Radack attorney for CIA whistleblower John Kiriakou. She is the National Security & Human Rights director at the Government Accountability Project and a former ethics adviser to the U.S. Department of Justice. https://www.democracynow.org/2013/1/30/whistleblower_john_kiriakou_for_embracing_torture Abu Zubaydah A high level detainee involved: the first major al Qaeda figure captured ARTICLES - FBI FBI dot gov - Attorney General Eric Holder Holder indicated: “Safeguarding classified information, including the identities of CIA officers involved in sensitive operations, is critical to keeping our intelligence officers safe and protecting our national security,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “Today’s charges reinforce the Justice Department’s commitment to hold accountable anyone who would violate the solemn duty not to disclose such sensitive information.” https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/washingtondc/press-releases/2012/former-cia-officer-john-kiriakou-charged- with-disclosing-covert-officers-identity-and-other-classified-information-to-journalists-and-lying-to-cias- publications-review-board FBI’s approach to the Kiriakou case https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/washingtondc/press-releases/2012/former-cia-officer-john-kiriakou-charged-with- disclosing-covert-officers-identity-and-other-classified-information-to-journalists-and-lying-to-cias-publications- review-board FBI dot gov: Summary of four count criminal complaint The four-count criminal complaint, which was filed today in the Eastern District of Virginia, alleges that Kiriakou made illegal disclosures about two CIA employees and their involvement in classified operations to two journalists on multiple occasions between 2007 and 2009. In one case, revealing the employee’s name as a CIA officer disclosed classified information as the employee was and remains covert (identified in the complaint as “Covert Officer A”). In the second case, Kiriakou allegedly disclosed the name and contact information of an employee, identified in the complaint as “Officer B,” whose participation in an operation to capture and question terrorism subject Abu Zubaydah in 2002 was then classified. Kiriakou’s alleged disclosures occurred prior to a June 2008 front-page story in The New York Times disclosing Officer B’s alleged role in the Abu Zubaydah operation. See Deuce Martinez described in http //www nytimes com/2008/06/22/washington/22ksm html https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/washingtondc/press-releases/2012/former-cia-officer-john-kiriakou-charged- with-disclosing-covert-officers-identity-and-other-classified-information-to-journalists-and-lying-to-cias- publications-review-board Article FBI dot gov - in entirety: FBI dot gov 2012/01/23 Former CIA Officer John Kiriakou Charged with Disclosing Covert Officer’s Identity and Other Classified Information to Journalists and Lying to CIA’s Publications Review Board; Investigation Involving Photos Seized from Guantanamo Detainees Concludes no Criminal Violations by Defense Team; Rather, Classified Info Kiriakou Allegedly Illegally Disclosed to a Journalist was Provided by the Journalist to a Defense Investigator. https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/washingtondc/press-releases/2012/former-cia-officer-john-kiriakou-charged-with- disclosing-covert-officers-identity-and-other-classified-information-to-journalists-and-lying-to-cias-publications- review-board U.S. Attorney’s Office/January 23, 2012/Northern District of Illinois/(312) 353-5300 ALEXANDRIA, VA—A former CIA officer, John Kiriakou, was charged today with repeatedly disclosing classified information to journalists, including the name of a covert CIA officer and information revealing the role of another CIA employee in classified activities, Justice Department officials announced. The charges result from an investigation that was triggered by a classified defense filing in January 2009, which contained classified information the defense had not been given through official government channels, and, in part, by the discovery in the spring of 2009 of photographs of certain government employees and contractors in the materials of high- value detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The investigation revealed that on multiple occasions, one of the journalists to whom Kiriakou is alleged to have illegally disclosed classified information, in turn, disclosed that information to a defense team investigator, and that this information was reflected in the classified defense filing and enabled the defense team to take or obtain surveillance photographs of government personnel. There are no allegations of criminal activity by any members of the defense team for the detainees. Kiriakou, 47, of Arlington, Va., was a CIA intelligence officer between 1990 and 2004, serving at headquarters and in various classified overseas assignments. He is scheduled to appear at 2 p.m. today before U.S. Magistrate Judge John F. Anderson in federal court in Alexandria. Kiriakou was charged with one count of violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act for allegedly illegally disclosing the identity of a covert officer and two counts of violating the Espionage Act for allegedly illegally disclosing national defense information to individuals not authorized to receive it. Kiriakou was also charged with one count of making false statements for allegedly lying to the Publications Review Board of the CIA in an unsuccessful attempt to trick the CIA into allowing him to include classified information in a book he was seeking to publish.The four-count criminal complaint, which was filed today in the Eastern District of Virginia, alleges that Kiriakou made illegal disclosures about two CIA employees and their involvement in classified operations to two journalists on multiple occasions between 2007 and 2009. In one case, revealing the employee’s name as a CIA officer disclosed classified information as the employee was and remains covert (identified in the complaint as “Covert Officer A”). In the second case, Kiriakou allegedly disclosed the name and contact information of an employee, identified in the complaint as “Officer B,” whose participation in an operation to capture and question terrorism subject Abu Zubaydah in 2002 was then classified. Kiriakou’s alleged disclosures occurred prior to a June 2008 front-page story in The New York Times disclosing Officer B’s alleged role in the Abu Zubaydah operation. “Safeguarding classified information, including the identities of CIA officers involved in sensitive operations, is critical to keeping our intelligence officers safe and protecting our national security,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “Today’s charges reinforce the Justice Department’s commitment to hold accountable anyone who would violate the solemn duty not to disclose such sensitive information.” Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, who was appointed Special Attorney in 2010 to supervise the investigation, said: “I want to thank the Washington Field Office of the FBI and the team of attorneys assigned to this matter for their hard work and dedication to tracing the sources of the leaks of classified information.” Mr. Fitzgerald announced the charges with James W. McJunkin, Assistant Director in Charge of the Washington Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and they thanked the Central Intelligence Agency for its very substantial assistance in the investigation, as well as the Air Force Office of Special Investigations for its significant assistance.“Protecting the identities of America’s covert operatives is one of the most important responsibilities of those who are entrusted with roles in our nation’s intelligence community. The FBI and our intelligence community partners work diligently to hold accountable those who violate that special trust,” said Mr. McJunkin.The CIA filed a crimes report with the Justice Department on March 19, 2009, prior to the discovery of the photographs and after reviewing the Jan. 19, 2009, classified filing by defense counsel for certain detainees with the military commission then responsible for adjudicating charges. The defense filing contained information relating to the identities and activities of covert government personnel, but prior to Jan. 19, 2009, there had been no authorized disclosure to defense counsel of the classified information. The Justice Department’s National Security Division, working with the FBI, began the investigation. To avoid the risk of encountering a conflict of interest because of the pending prosecutions of some of the high-value detainees, Mr. Fitzgerald was assigned to supervise the investigation conducted by a team of attorneys from the Southern District of New York, the Northern District of Illinois, and the Counterespionage Section of the National Security Division who were not involved in pending prosecutions of the detainees. According to the complaint affidavit, the investigation determined that no laws were broken by the defense team as no law prohibited defense counsel from filing a classified document under seal outlining for a court classified information they had learned during the course of their investigation. Regarding the 32 pages of photographs that were taken or obtained by the defense team and provided to the detainees, the investigation found no evidence the defense attorneys transmitting the photographs were aware of, much less disclosed, the identities of the persons depicted in particular photographs and no evidence that the defense team disclosed other classified matters associated with certain of those individuals to the detainees. The defense team did not take photographs of persons known or believed to be current covert officers. Rather, defense counsel, using a technique known as a double-blind photo lineup, provided photograph spreads of unidentified individuals to their clients to determine whether they recognized anyone who may have participated in questioning them. No law or military commission order expressly prohibited defense counsel from providing their clients with these photo spreads.Further investigation, based in part on e-mails recovered from judicially-authorized search warrants served on two e-mail accounts associated with Kiriakou, allegedly revealed that:Kiriakou disclosed to Journalist A the name of Covert Officer A and the fact that Covert Officer A was involved in a particular classified operation. The journalist then provided the defense investigator with the full name of the covert CIA employee; Kiriakou disclosed or confirmed to Journalists A, B, and C the then-classified information that Officer B participated in the Abu Zubaydah operation and provided two of those journalists with contact information for Officer B, including a personal e-mail address. One of the journalists subsequently provided the defense investigator with Officer B’s home telephone number, which the investigator used to identify and photograph Officer B; andKiriakou lied to the CIA regarding the existence and use of a classified technique, referred to as a “magic box,” in an unsuccessful effort to trick the CIA into allowing him to publish information about the classified technique in a book.Upon joining the CIA in 1990 and on multiple occasions in following years, Kiriakou signed secrecy and non-disclosure agreements not to disclose classified information to unauthorized individuals.Regarding Covert Officer A, the affidavit details a series of e-mail communications between Kiriakou and Journalist A in July and August 2008. In an exchange of e-mails on July 11, 2008, Kiriakou allegedly illegally confirmed for Journalist A that Covert Officer A, whose first name only was exchanged at that point, was “the team leader on [specific operation].” On August 18, 2008, Journalist A sent Kiriakou an e-mail asking if Kiriakou could pick out Covert Officer A’s last name from a list of names Journalist A provided in the e-mail. On Aug. 19, 2008, Kiriakou allegedly passed the last name of Covert Officer A to Journalist A by e-mail, stating “It came to me last night.” Covert Officer A’s last name had not been on the list provided by Journalist A. Later that same day, approximately two hours later, Journalist A sent an e-mail to the defense investigator that contained Covert Officer A’s full name. Neither Journalist A, nor any other journalist to the government’s knowledge, has published the name of Covert Officer A. At the time of Kiriakou’s allegedly unauthorized disclosures to Journalist A, the identification of Covert Officer A as “the team leader on [specific operation]” was classified at the Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information (SCI) level because it revealed both Covert Officer A’s identity and his association with the CIA’s Rendition, Detention, and Interrogation (RDI) Program relating to the capture, detention, and questioning of terrorism subjects. The defense investigator was able to identify Covert Officer A only after receiving the e-mail from Journalist A, and both Covert Officer A’s name and association with the RDI Program were included in the January 2009 classified defense filing. The defense investigator told the government that he understood from the circumstances that Covert Officer A was a covert employee and, accordingly, did not take his photograph. No photograph of Covert Officer A was recovered from the detainees at Guantanamo. In a recorded interview last Thursday, FBI agents told Kiriakou that Covert Officer A’s name was included in the classified defense filing. The affidavit states Kiriakou said, among other things, “How the heck did they get him? . . . [First name of Covert Officer A] was always undercover. His entire career was undercover.” Kiriakou further stated that he never provided Covert Officer A’s name or any other information about Covert Officer A to any journalist and stated “Once they get the names, I mean this is scary.”Regarding Officer B, the affidavit states that he worked overseas with Kiriakou on an operation to locate and capture Abu Zubaydah, and Officer B’s association with the RDI Program and the Abu Zubaydah operation in particular were classified until that information was recently declassified to allow the prosecution of Kiriakou to proceed.In June 2008, The New York Times published an article by Journalist B entitled “Inside the Interrogation of a 9/11 Mastermind,” which publicly identified Officer B and reported his alleged role in the capture and questioning of Abu Zubaydah—facts which were then classified. The article attributed other information to Kiriakou as a source, but did not identify the source(s) who disclosed or confirmed Officer B’s identity. The charges allege that at various times prior to publication of the article, Kiriakou provided Journalist B with personal information regarding Officer B, knowing that Journalist B was seeking to identify and locate Officer B. In doing so, Kiriakou allegedly confirmed classified information that Officer B was involved in the Abu Zubaydah operation. For example, Kiriakou allegedly e-mailed Officer B’s phone number and personal e-mail address to Journalist B, who attempted to contact Officer B via his personal e-mail in April and May 2008. Officer B had provided his personal e-mail address to Kiriakou, but not to Journalist B or any other journalist. Subsequently, Kiriakou allegedly revealed classified information by confirming for Journalist B additional information that an individual with Officer B’s name, who was associated with particular contact information that Journalist B had found on a website, was located in Pakistan in March 2002, which was where and when the Abu Zubaydah operation took place.After The New York Times article was published, Kiriakou sent several e-mails denying that he was the source for information regarding Officer B, while, at the same time, allegedly lying about the number and nature of his contacts with Journalist B. For example, in an e-mail dated June 30, 2008, Kiriakou told Officer B that Kiriakou had spoken to the newspaper’s ombudsman after the article was published and said that the use of Officer B’s name was “despicable and unnecessary” and could put Officer B in danger. Kiriakou also denied that he had cooperated with the article and claimed that he had declined to talk to Journalist B, except to say that he believed the article absolutely should not mention Officer B’s name. “[W]hile it might not be illegal to name you, it would certainly be immoral,” Kiriakou wrote to Officer B, according to the affidavit.From at least November 2007 through November 2008, Kiriakou allegedly provided Journalist A with Officer B’s personal contact information and disclosed to Journalist A classified information revealing Officer B’s association with the RDI Program. Just as Journalist A had disclosed to the defense investigator classified information that Kiriakou allegedly imparted about Covert Officer A, Journalist A, in turn, provided the defense investigator information that Kiriakou had disclosed about Officer B. For example, in an e-mail dated April 10, 2008, Journalist A provided the defense investigator with Officer B’s home phone number, which, in light of Officer B’s common surname, allowed the investigator to quickly and accurately identify Officer B and photograph him. Both Officer B’s name and his association with the RDI Program were included in the January 2009 classified defense filing, and four photographs of Officer B were among the photos recovered at Guantanamo.In the same recorded interview with FBI agents last week, Kiriakou said he “absolutely” considered Officer B’s association with the Abu Zubaydah operation classified, the affidavit states. Kiriakou also denied providing any contact information for Officer B or Officer B’s association with the Abu Zubaydah operation to Journalists A and B prior to publication of the June 2008 New York Times article. When specifically asked whether he had anything to do with providing Officer B’s name or other information about Officer B to Journalist B prior to the article, Kiriakou stated “Heavens no.”As background, the affidavit states that sometime prior to May 22, 2007, Kiriakou disclosed to Journalist C classified information regarding Officer B’s association with Abu Zubaydah operation, apparently while collaborating on a preliminary book proposal. A footnote states that Journalist C is not the coauthor of the book Kiriakou eventually published.Prior to publication of his book, The Reluctant Spy: My Secret Life in the CIA’s War on Terror, Kiriakou submitted a draft manuscript in July 2008 to the CIA’s Publication Review Board (PRB). In an attempt to trick the CIA into allowing him to publish information regarding a classified investigative technique, Kiriakou allegedly lied to the PRB by falsely claiming that the technique was fictional and that he had never heard of it before. In fact, according to a transcript of a recorded interview conducted in August 2007 to assist Kiriakou’s coauthor in drafting the book, Kiriakou described the technique, which he referred to as the “magic box,” and told his coauthor that the CIA had used the technique in the Abu Zubaydah operation. The technique was also disclosed in the June 2008 New York Times article and referred to as a “magic box.”In his submission letter to the PRB, Kiriakou flagged the reference to a device called a “magic box,” stating he had read about it in the newspaper article but added that the information was “clearly fabricated,” as he was unaware of and had used no such device. The affidavit contains the contents of an August 2008 e-mail that Kiriakou sent his coauthor admitting that he lied to the PRB in an attempt to include classified information in the book. The PRB subsequently informed Kiriakou that the draft manuscript contained classified information that he could not use, and information regarding the technique that Kiriakou included in the manuscript remained classified until it was recently declassified to allow Kiriakou’s prosecution to proceed.Upon conviction, the count charging illegal disclosure of Covert Officer A’s identity to a person not authorized to receive classified information carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison, which must be imposed consecutively to any other term of imprisonment; the two counts charging violations of the Espionage Act each carry a maximum term of 10 years in prison; and making false statements carries a maximum prison term of five years. Each count carries a maximum fine of $250,000. A complaint contains only allegations and is not evidence of guilt. The defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.The government is being represented in court by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Iris Lan (Southern District of New York) and Mark E. Schneider (Northern District of Illinois), and DOJ trial attorney Ryan Fayhee, of the Counterespionage Section of the National Security Division. Assistant U.S. Attorney Lisa Owings (Eastern District of Virginia) will assist in the matter under local court rules.This content has been reproduced from its original source. Older material, some of it might be repeated above, still editing this section Wikipedia FBI and CIA response to whistleblowers of the CIA’s use of torture - AG Eric Holder, FBI website/case The FBI, CIA, Department of Justice and others lied, mishandled, evaded the truth and thwarted justice in the issues surrounding CIA torture. An ex-CIA agent getting the truth out through the media or anywhere else about CIA torture should not have had to push the barrel uphill and should not have been punished in any way. His name and record should be cleared. A public apology by the American government should be demanded. The FBI website depicting one case reveals a good deal. The FBI lays open its bias and overall orientation. It also reveals some of the inconsistencies in the attorney general who pushed for punishing one whistleblower but later seems to have received some credit for pushing for reform. Follow the path of AG Eric Holder - a black Attorney General: “Eric Himpton Holder Jr. served as the 82nd Attorney General of the United States, from 2009 to 2015. Holder, serving in the administration of President Barack Obama, was the first African American to hold the position of U.S. Attorney General.” https //en wikipedia org/wiki/Eric_Holder ARTICLE FBI (01/23/2012) Referencing: FBI dot gov: https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/washingtondc/press-releases/2012/former-cia-officer-john-kiriakou-charged-with- disclosing-covert-officers-identity-and-other-classified-information-to-journalists-and-lying-to-cias-publications- review-board Other Articles: New York Times: Inside a 9/11 Mastermind’s Interrogation. By Scott Shane (06/22/2008) http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/22/washington/22ksm.html Settlement Reached in C.I.A. Torture Case (08/17/2017) later lawsuit following FBI article https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/17/us/cia-torture-lawsuit- settlement.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FC.I.A.%20Interrogations&action=click&contentCollection=timesto pics&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=collection FBI website – Washington Field Office 2012 January 23 Background: Even though this FBI article was back in Jan 2012 – (as of this date of 12/01/2017, close to 6 years ago) there are loose threads and interweaving names in networks which should still be reviewed and focused on. Notice that a general thrust in the FBI article is in response to classified defense filing – defense discussed in this FBI article refers to that which was for the detainees in CIA prisons – not to be confused with Department of Defense, military defense in general or legal defense for the CIA; a detainee defense file was created which spurred an investigation for the defense which included information and evidence gathering – including photos. This in turn spurred a file and investigation on the part of the CIA to investigate how the detainee defense got hold of enough info to know what to do (what to focus on) to provide evidence that the detainees were being abused. Notice, however, how this FBI report is detached from mentioning the word “torture” or giving any sign of governmental complicity with its negative acts in CIA prisons; the focus is entirely on security violations and “lies of trickery” by John Kiriakou. These security violations focus on his revelations of government secrets: names and activities. Because the tone of the FBI report is so slanted, we need to follow the trail of various people who are associated with its “team.” Notice the trail of attorney assistants across various states around the Washington area, for example. Notice how the Justice Department is acting like a policing agency itself – both policing and judging. Organizations, agencies, divisions, programs Washington Field Office Justice Department National Security Division of Justice Dept. RDI Air Force Office of Special Investigations Publication Review Board of CIA – regarding Kiriakou’s then upcoming book NAMES FBI ARTICLE-01/23/2012 same list as in menu at top of page, usable for this section which goes into more detail per name-this might take awhile to develop. (Please note the regional aspect in that various states were involved): Anderson, John F. (U.S. Magistrate Judge in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia) Fayhee, Ryan (DOJ trial attorney Counterespionage Section of the National Security Division) Fitzgerald Patrick J. (Special Attorney Northern District of Illinois) Holder, Eric (Attorney General) Lan, Iris (Assistant U.S. Attorney/Southern District of New York) McJunkin, James W. FBI (Separate Page-FBI section) Owings, Lisa (Assistant U.S. Attorney(Eastern District of Virginia) Schneider, Mark E. (Northern District of Illinois) Other names -related to FBI Article (12/23/2012) Rizzo, John then CIA general Counsel - demanded investigation (see Mother Jones 01/23/2012) Names From Democracy Now: https://www.democracynow.org/2013/1/30/whistleblower_john_kiriakou_for_embracing_torture Judge Leonie Brinkema Attorneys Fitzgerald Patrick J. (Special Attorney Northern District of Illinois) From article: United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, who was appointed Special Attorney in 2010 to supervise the investigation, said: “I want to thank the Washington Field Office of the FBI and the team of attorneys assigned to this matter for their hard work and dedication to tracing the sources of the leaks of classified information.” Mr. Fitzgerald announced the charges with James W. McJunkin, Assistant Director in Charge of the Washington Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and they thanked the Central Intelligence Agency for its very substantial assistance in the investigation, as well as the Air Force Office of Special Investigations for its significant assistance. From Mother Jones: Then the Obama administration called in famed US Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, who handled the Plame investigation and prosecuted former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich, to take over the probe http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2012/01/john-kiriakou-cia-leak-investigation/ Chicago Tribune Verdict could cast light or shadow on Patrick Fitzgerald: By Stacy St. Clair and Jeff Coen (08/07/2010) One way or another, the man who brought the case against Blagojevich might be affected. hhttp://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-08-07/news/ct-met-patrick-fitzgerald- 20100807_blagojevich-case-patrick-fitzgerald- Washington Post: Trial in Error. By Victoria Toensing (02/16/2007) on Fitzgerald: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/16/AR2007021601705.htmlFBI McJunkin, James W. See separate page System Abuse/FBI/Agents/Other/McJunkin, James W. Democracy Now https://www.democracynow.org/2013/1/30/whistleblower_john_kiriakou_for_embracing_torture Excerpt: Kiriakou: I don’t know what changed between October and January, other than the fact that she and the prosecution had had several ex parte communications. What that means is the prosecutors were able to meet with the judge, related to my case, without the defense, my attorneys, being present. So we have no idea what it was that the prosecution told the judge. We were not allowed to defend ourselves. Indeed, Judge Brinkema denied 75 motions that we made asking for declassification of information so that I could present a defense. In August of 2012, after our motions had been denied, my attorneys and I walked out of the courtroom, and my attorney said, “We have no defense. She won’t let us say anything. She won’t let us defend you.” And so, we were forced into plea negotiations. But again, I’m not sure why the judge changed her position between October and January; it was inexplicable to me. Updates: 2021/01/27 editing of both Kiriakou-3 and 4; 2021/01/10-15 (week of) PAGE STARTED-John Kiriakou/FBI/Court, includes some editing and organizing, this page moved from rivergold dot net.
Index Index
WHISTLE-3a John Kiriakou: FBI and Court Case
Whistleblowers-3 Background-Kiriakou Issues o Charges o Acts Involved o Judges/Others Involved o Names o Abu Zubaydah Article FBI o “The magic box”